The NFL Has A Plan For STL

After a few days of watching and reading old news clips, snippets, monologues, articles on everyone’s opinions on the NFL, St. Louis, the NFL in St. Louis and basically everything revolving around that fact. It seems to me that there are many people who blow up their keyboards on social media, regular folks and media personalities telling the reader or listener to “Screw the NFL!” “We don’t need them!” “If they want to come back they can pick up the bill and pay for everything.” All of these statements are valid points and they are completely justified in their feelings towards the matter. The NFL DID KNOWINGLY stick it to STL in the search for ever-increasing revenue streams to flow through the already clotted veins of the NFL’s pulsating black heart.

101 ESPN’s and St. Louis’ very own Randy Karraker has made his feelings very clear about the NFL and what they did to STL and NFL fandom in general. His speech at the NFL relocation hearings in STL from the end of 2015-2016 are something to behold. After the move, his monologue on the “Bernie & Randy” podcast was everything the STL NFL fan felt over this deal. The passion in his words moved this man to tears and to be honest I’m not afraid to state that fact.

I couldn’t attend the hearing because the NFL had capped the attendance at 1000 people with their excuse being that the two other markets (OAK, SD) didn’t have suitable facilities to house the events that had more than a thousand seats. I call bullshit! STL’s showing and rabid support of their fandom and “DIGNITY” showed the NFL that even though Kroenke stacked the deck, even though there was a complete effort on the NFL’s part to get Stan to the luscious lands of LA in his bid to move up the Forbes list. We all could see the writing on the wall, to be honest, we just couldn’t believe that the NFL would be so callous in their attempt to move the franchise back to LA in the face of it all.

Let’s be very clear about something, the NFL and it’s slimy, mangy, cronies never expected STL or the fans to put up much of a fight, much like what happened in SD and OAK. They stacked the deck against STL, pushed the stadium task force to keep moving forward (to the tune of $16 million) with their planning of a new stadium damn well knowing the fact that they (the NFL) had absolutely no intentions on staying in the gateway city. Stan Kroenke, Kevin Demoff, Eric Grubman, and Roger Goodell are all bedfellows in this devious game of musical chairs. LA was granted a seat before the game ever started, so STL was behind the 8-ball from the start. If you’re asking yourself then why the dog and pony show if they just wanted to leave then why not just leave then?

I’ll tell you why…

The NFL knew they couldn’t just up and move out of STL. They had to have justifiable reasoning to do so, regardless of how we feel about it. The NFL had to protect itself during the rigged process so there was no question to the league’s “integrity” and I use that term loosely. Even though the NFL did a masterful job at covering their tracks, the excitement from some in the Rams organization and some outside of it spilled some of the beans on the matter which has led to St. Louis, St. Louis County, and the Regional sports authority to sue Stan Kroenke and the other 31 principal owners in the league for multiple grievances.

Let’s be clear, do I think that STL has a chance to win a lawsuit against the NFL? In any situation there is a chance. That being said it’s minimal at best and the NFL has revenue streams that STL doesn’t have. The real threat is that this could go to discovery, which it has and I will tell you that the NFL has ZERO interest of this ever seeing the light of day. There will be a settlement in the matter, what that entails I do not know, but there will be a settlement.

Now this brings me to the current rumors of the Chargers being linked to a possible St. Louis move. Let me be very clear, this information never gets out unless the NFL wants it out there. This is a ploy by the powers that be within the NFL that want to settle the lawsuit to keep it from going to discovery and open court to protect the league.

I’ll go even further on the Chargers situation in LA. Projected PSL sales weren’t just down, they were drastically lower than anticipated from $400 million to $150 million. The NFL has already had meetings with the ownership groups and are weighing their options on what to do with the team. I’m tired of hearing that they have a 40-year lease and they can leave after 20 so that tells you they’re not leaving, or that the league cannot force the Spanos’ to sell the team.

FALSE.

The NFL can do whatever it wants and they have shown this in forcing out Jerry Richardson, former owner of the Panthers for “Conduct detrimental to the League.” Even though he agreed to sell you know it was hostile. If Dean Spanos went rogue and against league wishes, what do you think they’ll do? Stan Kroenke owns the lease and he can release them anytime he wants. The Chargers will have to start paying their $600+ million dollar relocation fee in 2019 that the league assessed them on their move to LA in 2016. They’ve started pricing their tickets drastically lower than their counterpart in LA, the Rams. Make no mistake, the Chargers are in serious trouble, but that doesn’t mean they will automatically be forced to pick up and move to the Gateway City. What it does mean is that the NFL is vetting their options and considering the lawsuit forcing the NFL into a discovery process they don’t want to be in, in a market that doesn’t support them (LA), their prior market of San Diego won’t have them and even if they could between the Spanos’ and SD they’ve had a dozen or more possible stadium proposals that have never even come close to panning out.

So, if you are the NFL where do you go? Let’s not forget that the Bills are in a bad spot in Buffalo (#53 TV market) with their current and long-standing stadium issues at the Ralph, The Jaguars have been linked to a London move for several years and it looks like current circumstances (Shahid Khan being investigated for corruption in his bid to buy Wembley Stadium) and statements by NFL officials that London looks to be more of an expansion opportunity than relocation so it looks like the Jags will not be moving from Jacksonville (#42 TV market) to London at all. The Jags are very much in play for a relocation as are the Bills and possibly the Chargers.

What other markets are available that are NFL ready as in (Plug and Play) where you can take a team overnight, plug them in and let them go. St. Louis is about it. There are other cities don’t get me wrong and I have stated in interviews and in writing that those particular cities are not ready immediately for NFL football. It would take them at least a year or two to be ready, possibly more.

Lots of people say that everything hinges on the lawsuit between STL and the NFL and I’d agree that it does play a part, but it’s not the whole enchilada. St. Louis is the only market that is NFL ready and that’s a fact. STL was NFL ready and capable when they ripped the Rams away to pad their pockets.

All I’m saying is that at the end of the day the NFL wants to be in St. Louis just for the fact of being in the #21 TV market that won’t infringe on other markets and they know that we have supported our teams even though they said the opposite when they yanked the Rams. Don’t get me wrong, the NFL is worried about the lawsuit, but it’s just a small piece of a much larger puzzle that is being played out and at the end of the day we will slowly hear information coming over the next few months on what the NFL’s grand plan is, because we know it involves money.

Thanks for reading.

Derek King

N The Zone Contributor

WWW.DEREKKINGSPORTS.COM

Don’t forget to check out My interview on N The Zone

2017 NBA Combine: Measurements vs. College Listings

Shane Gray (@RealShaneGray)

Earlier this month, the NBA held its annual Draft Combine, where dozens of NBA hopefuls and representatives of all 30 NBA teams gathered for player interviews, athletic and strength tests, 5 on 5 scrimmages and, yes — official length and height measurements.

For decades, fans have taken interest in discovering just how tall some of the NCAA’s biggest stars actually were/are. Some of the measurements over the years have been eye-opening and — in some cases — hurt a prospects draft stock.

Way back in 1992, Oklahoma State stud Byron Houston — a collegiate All-American who was listed at 6’7″ with the Cowboys — measured just 6’4″ barefoot at the Combine, putting him closer to 6’5″ in shoes than his supposed 6’7″.

More recently, Kansas State standout Michael Beasley — who was billed at 6’10” in college and has continued to be listed at 6’10” at his various NBA stops — measured just 6’7″ in socks and 6’8″ 1/4 with shoes at the 2008 Combine.

As you can guess, some teams showed diminished interest in Houston and Beasley after their measurements. For Houston, who primarily played the post, 6’5″ in shoes wasn’t nearly as attractive as 6’7″. For Beasley, a classic tweener who can play a little at both the three and the four, his 6’8″ in- shoes measurement wasn’t as appealing to some clubs as a 6’10” measurement would have been.

At this year’s combine, as has long been the case, many of the players came up significantly shorter than advertised. I took the time to compare every prospect measured at the Combine to their college listing, checking at least two to three sources to ensure accuracy. Here are the results — first as a group and then individually.

Of 66 players measured both with and without shoes early in day when people are significantly taller (1/3 inch to 3/4 inch+ in some cases than afternoon/evening due to spinal compression), here are the results of the NO SHOES measurements:

-13 of 66 prospects (19.6%) measured 2 to 2.5 inches below their listed college height.
-29 of 66 players (43.9%) measured 1.75 to 2.5 inches below listed college height.
-41 of 66 prospects (62.1%) measured 1.5 to 2.5 inches below listed college height.
-50 of 66 players (75.7%) measured 1.25 to 2.5 inches below listed college height.
-59 of 66 players (89.3%) measured 1 to 2.5 inches below listed college height.
-62 of 66 prospects (93.9%) measured .75 to 2.5 inches below listed college height.
-65 of 66 players (98.4%) measured .5 to 2.5 inches below listed college height.
-1 of 66 players (1.5%) measured same height as listed college height.

In terms of IN SHOE measurements — players play in shoes, after all, and thus in-shoe measurements are completely valid and appropriate — just 25 of 66 measured as tall as their listed college height. Even with shoes on, 41 of 66 were shorter than their listed college height.

Individually, the results were as follows:

Player                     No Shoes     In Shoes      College Listing  College
Jonathon Jeanne   7’0 3/4″         7’2″                 7’2″                       France
Thomas Welsh      6’11 1/2″        7’0 1/2″          7’0″                       UCLA
Omer Yurtseven   6’10 1/2″        6’11 3/4″       7’0″                       N.C. State
Zach Collins           6’10 1/4″        7’0″               7’0″                       Gonzaga
Justin Patton          6’10”              6’11 1/4″       7’0″                      Creighton
Moritz Wagner      6’10”              6’11 1/4″       6’11”                    Michigan
Thomas Bryant      6’9 1/2″         6’10 3/4″      6’10”                     Indiana
Tony Bradley          6’9 1/4″         6’10” 3/4″     6’11”                     UNC
Harry Giles             6’9 1/4″         6’10” 1/2″     6’10 & 6’11”         Duke
Jarrett Allen           6’9″                6’10 1/4″      6’11”                     Texas
Bam Adebayo        6’8 3/4″          6’9 3/4″        6’10”                     Kentucky
TJ Leaf                     6’8 3/4″         6’9 3/4″         6’10”                     UCLA
Kennedy Meeks     6’8 3/4″         6’10 1/4″       6’10”                     UNC
Ivan Rabb               6’8 3/4″         6’10”              6’11”                    California
DJ Wilson                6’8 3/4″         6’10 1/2″       6’10”                    Michigan
Ike Anigbogu          6’8 1/2″         6’9 3/4″         6’10”                    UCLA
Eric Mica                 6’8 1/2″         6’9 1/4″         6’10”                    BYU
John Collins            6’8 1/4″         6’9 1/2″         6’10”                    Wake Forest
Tyler Lydon            6’8 1/4″         6’9 1/2″         6’9″                      Syracuse
Chris Boucher        6’8″                6’9 1/2″         6’10”                    Oregon
Kyle Kuzma            6’8″                6’9 1/2″         6’9″                      Utah
Jonathan Motley    6’7 3/4″         6’8″ 3/4″        6’10”                   Baylor
Caleb Swanigan     6’7 1/2″         6’8 1/2″          6’9″                     Purdue
Isaiah Hicks            6’7 1/4″         6’8 1/2″          6’9″                     UNC
Alec Peters              6’7 1/4           6’8 3/4″         6’9″                     Valparaiso
Jordan Bell             6’7″                6’8 1/2″         6’9″                      Oregon
Justin Jackson        6’7″                6’8 1/4″         6’8″                      UNC
Cameron Oliver     6’7″                6’8 1/4″         6’8″                     Nevada
Devin Robinson     6’7″                6’8 1/4″         6’8″                     Florida
Svi Mykhailiuk      6’6 1/2            6’7 1/2″         6’8″                    Kansas
OG Anunoby           6’6 1/4″          6’7 3/4″         6’8″                    Indiana
V.T. Beachem          6’6 1/4″          6’8″                6’8″                    Notre Dame
Nigel Hayes            6’6 1/4″          6’7 1/2″          6’8″                    Wisconsin
Jaron Blossomgame 6’5 3/4″      6’6 3/4″          6’7″                    Clemson
Justin Jackson        6’5 3/4″         6’7″                 6’7″                    Maryland
Jamel Artis             6’5 1/2″         6’6 3/4″           6’7″                    Pittsburgh
Terrance Ferguson 6’5 1/2″       6’7″                 6’7″                    Abelaine 36ers (pro)
Wesley Iwundu     6’5 1/2″         6’6 3/4″           6’7″                    Kansas State
P.J. Dozier               6’5 1/4″         6’6 3/4″           6’6″                    South Carolina
Semi Ojeleye          6’5 1/4″         6’6″                 6’7″                    SMU
Dillon Brooks         6’5″               6’6″                 6’7″                    Oregon
Dwayne Bacon      6’4 3/4″         6’6 1/4″           6’7″                    Florida State
Damyean Dotson  6’4 1/2″         6’5 1/2″           6’5″                    Houston
Luke Kennard        6’4 1/2″        6’5 1/2″           6’6″                    Duke
Davon Reed            6’4 1/2″        6’5 1/2″           6’6″                    Miami
Peter Jok                 6’4 1/2″         6’5 3/4″          6’6″                     Iowa
Edmond Sumner   6’4″               6’5 3/4″          6’6″                     Xavier
Hamidou Diallo     6’3 3/4″         6’5″                6’5″                     Kentucky
Josh Hart                 6’3 3/4″         6’5″                6’5 1/2″              Villanova
Sindarius Thornwell 6’3 1/2″     6’4 3/4″         6’5″                    South Carolina
Kobi Simmons        6’3 1/4″         6’4 1/2″         6’5″                    Arizona
Derrick White        6’3 1/4″          6’4 1/2″         6’5″                    Colorado
Tyler Dorsey           6’3″                6’4 1/2″         6’4″                    Oregon
Andrew Jones         6’3″                6’4 1/4″         6’4″                    Texas
Rawle Alkins          6’2 1/2″          6’3 3/4″         6’5″                    Arizona
De’ Aaron Fox        6’2″                 6’3 1/4″         6’3″                    Kentucky
Frank Jackson        6’2                  6’3 1/2″         6’3″                    Duke
Nigel Williams-Goss 6’1 1/2″       6’3″               6’3″                    Gonzaga
Isaiah Briscoe        6’1 1/4″           6’2 3/4″        6’3″                     Kentucky
Donovan Mitchell  6’1 1/4″          6’3″               6’3″                    Louisville
Monte Morris         6’1 1/4″           6’2 1/2″        6’3″                    Iowa State
Melo Trimble         6’1 1/4″           6’2 1/2″        6’3″                    Maryland
Kadeem Allen        6’1″                 6’2 3/4″         6’3″                    Arizona
Frank Mason         5’11”                6’0″               5’11”                  Kansas
Derrick Walton     5’11”                6’0 3/4″         6’1″                   Michigan
Jawun Evans         5’10 3/4″          5’11 1/2″       6’1″                  Oklahoma State

The Finale from Legends Of The Dome

 

Legends-of-Dome-320@thelegendkil

ST. LOUIS, MO

The Legends of the Dome flag football game lived up to the hype and then some. The score of the game didn’t matter. There were plenty of hugs, handshakes, and tears shed last Saturday in what was our last time ever stepping in that building to watch football. One of the best moments was the player introduction and I stood right by the tunnel as every single St.Louis Rams player was announced. And I swear it gave me goosebumps watching those guys run through that fog for the last time. It was great catching up with some of the former Rams players like Roland Williams who videobombed me on the field as I was interviewing Jackie Joyner-Kersee.

One of the biggest cheers was for Hall of Fame tackle Orlando Pace who was honored at halftime at midfield with his family. 101 ESPN Randy Karraker delivered some heartfelt words for Pace who makes his home here in St.Louis. Pace also was taken on the golf cart and waved to the crowd of over 10,000 people and thanking them for support and love.

Some of those guys still look like they can play today. Former Rams cornerback Dre Bly came over to me on the sideline and said,”Please pray for us cause I’m out of shape.” Keith Lyle told me after the game that he hopes this event continues. I think we should try bowling or softball from here on out,” said Lyle. Then he paused for a second when I reminded him it’s hot as can be outside. You right bowling it is, said Lyle as he bent over in laughter next to Jeff Wilkins who was sporting an ace bandage on his foot he tweaked his ankle. Wilkins quipped,”Man this is going to mess up my golf game.”

I also got a chance to interview several prominent figures from the Greatest Show on Turf including Mike Martz and Dick Vermeil. You can watch those interviews on St.Louis American Youtube channel. When the game was over and they started turning off the lights I was still standing on the field and then a stadium employee told me I got 12 minutes to leave. I didn’t want to leave yet. I got so many memories from the double overtime loss to the Carolina Panthers, seeing Larry Fitzgerald first game, or seeing former Big Red wideout Roy Green who was my all-time favorite when I was a kid. As I was walking down that long hallway past the locker rooms for the final time I saw D’Marco Farr we looked at each other and I said,”this is it man I can’t believe it.” Farr shook his head, “I know,” he said.

Bittersweet it was, and maybe this will stoke the fire once again for the NFL, it’s going to take some time for the wound to heal. But, I appreciate what Isaac Bruce continues to do for the city of St.Louis and help provide a chance for all of us to have some closure on the Rams no longer being in St.Louis and this town returning back to a two-sport town again. For more coverage please subscribe to our Youtube page at STLAmerican/Video and you can also follow me on twitter @thelegendkil @NTheZoneShow @NTheZoneNetwork