The Derek King Sports Show: EPISODE 2 03-11-19

On the latest episode of “The Derek King Sports Show,” STL has the NFL, they just don’t know it yet. Derek discusses the current and past lawsuits involving NFL relocation.

The Derek King Sports Show – EPISODE 2 “STL Has The NFL, They Just Don’t Know It”

Follow Derek @ Derek King Sports on Twitter

Catch him on The Weekly Show w/ Ron Nuttall every Thursday night at 8:00PM CST on Cards on Deck Network

The A-Train Show – Bauce (of The Forever Oakland Initiative) 03-10-19

For the first time on “The A-Train Show,” the A-Train welcomes Bauce (@bauce_man82) of the Forever Oakland Initiative. Here they discuss the happenings in Oakland with their lawsuit against the NFL, how they learned from St. Louis and what it could mean for the city of Oakland if St. Louis wins their lawsuit, in addition to showing love to guys in Los Angeles who are their biggest Twitter fans. An explosive 2-part (segment) conversation that brought out the feelings and humor of the A-Train and Bauce and is definitely one worth listening to.

The A-Train Show – Bauce (of Forever Oakland Initiative) 03-10-19

A New “Frontiere” In St. Louis, A “Kroenke” Ending

Georgia Frontiere and Stan Kroenke

@DerekKingSports

After the failed expansion attempts in STL for a new a NFL franchise, city leaders were pushing hard for a reward after piling millions into the nearly open TWA Dome.

Georgia Frontiere was looking for greener pastures out of LA because she couldn’t get a stadium deal done. During the ’94 season the Rams became a lame duck in LA. Attendance tanked, fans tuned out, they saw the writing on the wall. They all knew what was coming and they didn’t even put up a fight (except for a slight few) to try and keep the team. The Rams made an initial attempt to move out of LA which was disapproved by the NFL owners. Then when STL officials were given the go ahead by city leadership to everything necessary to land a franchise in STL they went all out and sold their soul in the process.

Sad thing is and this is just my opinion, St. Louis already had the Rams if they had made a better attempt at negotiating the lease with the Rams, instead they gave up the farm in order to land a team that could’ve been theirs for a lot less than the sweetheart deal that was given. St. Louis payed $15 million in relocation fees, The Rams got a $260 million dollar stadium, a $15 million dollar practice facility in Earth City and a $250,000 yearly lease, St. Louis also ate the Rams’ $30 million debt to LA and all this to land a team in the Lou.

As you can see everybody’s good old buddy Georgia that so desperately wanted to come home to STL to save Football was a farce. She made millions in the process of coming “home” the Rams went from operating at a $9 million dollar loss a year in LA to a $20 million dollar profit a year in STL. Say it ain’t so Georgia! Oh, it be so! So after the slam dunk of expansion just kissed off the rim, officials gave away the farm for magic beans that barely grew and were half rotten.

Enter Kroenke

In ’95 when the team moved Georgia sold a 40% stake in the team to Stanley Enos Kroenke the wealthy real estate tycoon hailing from Columbia, Mo.

He bought the 40% stake for, get this, $60 million. That’s right, you read that correctly. Then when the unfortunate passing of majority owner Georgia Frontiere passed away from cancer in 2008 the Rosenbloom children became de facto owners of a team they didn’t want. They started shopping the team and Shahid Khan places the winning bid to buy the team, but OUTTA NOWHERE COMES STAN KROENKE!!! He put the kibosh on Khan’s attempt to buy the team and exercised his right of first refusal which was in his contract when he bought his 40% share. He purchased the remainder of the Rams for $450 million. If you do the math he’s in to the tune of $510 million on a franchise value at the time in 2010 of $750 million. He knew he was going to move then if not planning contingencies before the fact.

Kroenke was in this for the long haul. He was in this like an investment property, knowing it would triple in value if he moved it to LA LA Land and then he be rolling in it.

Just think of it this way, if it wasn’t for all those untold millions and millions that the Rams made off of the backs of taxpayers they probably wouldn’t have ever sniffed a Super Bowl, let alone make it to the playoffs. That influx of ministry support is what made it float, and when the lake dried up, they pulled anchor and sailed out of town back to LA.

So who was Frontiere? Savior? Money grabber?

What was Kroenke? The Grinch That Stole Football? Ebenezer Scrooge? That piece of food stuck between your teeth?

Frontiere did bring football back to St. Louis albeit selling her soul, or 40% to the devil to get it, well, maybe devil is a little harsh…..then again, no it isn’t.

Thanks for reading.

Derek King

N The Zone Network contributor

The Good, The Bad, The Ugly: How St. Louis Lost, Won, and suffered from the NFL ’89-’94

@DerekKingSports

Where do you want to start?

Where do you end?

It just seem that for the great people of St. Louis, it never began or ended. So lets start at the beginning, of the end (the first time).

1988, William “Bill” Bidwell wants out of St. Louis, the town he’s called home since 1960, filing for relocation with the league. On March 15th 1988 the NFL voted to allow the St. Louis Cardinals to relocate to Phoenix, Arizona putting the final coffin nail in the franchises 28 year history in St. Louis. The vote was 26-2 with the now Los Angeles Raiders and Miami Dolphins abstaining. Both Al Davis and Joe Robbie were against the measure for their own reasons.

Davis was still engulfed in a legal battle with the NFL over his ill-advised move into the greater Los Angeles area. and due to the aforementioned legal issues with the league, Davis decided it was best to abstain from the vote, but he wasn’t all too thrilled about the matter.

Source: New York Times

 “It’s all a sham. They vote any way they want and allow anyone they want to move.” Al Davis

Joe Robbie was good friends with Joe Foss, former American Football League commissioner who represented a Phoenix group spent $2 million in a failed attempt to bring an expansion team to Phoenix.

The NFL as a group wasn’t enthralled about the idea of letting the Cardinals move to Phoenix either. The league would have preferred a move to Baltimore as the Phoenix area was looked at as an excellent candidate for expansion, this was all going down long after the Irsay-Rosenbloom debacle in 1972 which the Rams and Colts franchises were traded with their respective owners. That’s another story for another day.

St. Louis Expansion attempt

Jerry Clinton, Former Grey Eagle Distributors owner, who as part owner in the St. Louis Blues and St. Louis Steamers indoor soccer team, Mr. Clinton, told Civic Progress members over breakfast at the Bogey Club of their plans to build a new stadium and bring a new football team to St. Louis. On Feb. 27, 1989, they formed the St. Louis NFL Partnership.

Source: St. Louis Post Dispatch 

 

Mr. Clinton said it had been easy to raise money to buy a team. That turned out to be an exaggeration.

The partnership mailed a prospectus to local entrepreneurs asking for $250,000 each. They got just one solid commitment.

Meanwhile, Mr. Clinton was lending his partner money. “He had no other source of income. … He had to have living expenses,” Mr. Clinton explained.

The two partners lobbied the Missouri Legislature to approve financing to build a stadium-convention center they said would be self-supporting.

The legislation passed but never was used for the stadium. Instead, the city, county and state are paying the tab.

Mr. Clinton lobbied the NFL for an expansion franchise. He even signed a lease for his team to play at St. Louis’ new downtown domed stadium.

As most can see it was a very convoluted series of events. the original group lead by Mr. Clinton and James Busch Orthwein was stalling financially where as Orthwien couldn’t sell his team New England Patriots so he stepped aside allowing Stanley Enos Kroenke to be added to the group. Clinton made a bold move, he left the group and then teamed with a competing group lead by Fran Murray

Source: New York Times, FRANK LITSKY

Although Clinton’s group seems out of the picture, Fran Murray, an entrepreneur and a former minority owner of the Patriots, said yesterday he had taken over as majority general partner of the group. Last week, Orthwein dismissed a proposal by Murray to exchange 100 percent of the Patriots for 66 percent of a new St. Louis franchise. Murray said he would pay the $140 million fee for the St. Louis franchise.

Speaking by telephone from a plane en route to Chicago, Murray said he and three investors now controlled 54 percent of the group. He said he would appear this morning at a joint meeting of the N.F.L.’s expansion and finance committees in Chicago and identify the three investors. He said his appearance before the committees had been arranged by Jay Moyer, the league’s general counsel.

Murray said the remaining 46 percent of his group would be held by Clinton (20 percent), Orthwein (12 percent) Walter Payton (10 percent) and Tom Holley (4 percent). He would not say what share of the group he would retain himself. When asked if Clayton, Orthwein, Payton and Holley had agreed to this change, he said:

“They have not told me they would not participate. I sent them faxes and letters and have not heard that they did not want to remain part of the group.”

So, now you can see that series of events that unfolded during the process. Clinton-Orthwein, Clinton-Kroenke, Murray-Clinton-Orthwein-Payton-Holley and then Competing group; Stan Kroenke, Charles Knight, Andrew Taylor, and John Connelly.

If you are reading that trying to make sense out of what you just read, I was doing the same writing it. The process was so fluid and ever-changing I don’t even think the people involved knew what was happening. All of these things occurred between ’89-’94.

Also during this expansion process mess in St. Louis, Orthwein, bought the New England Patriots in 1992.

St. Louis had already begun construction on the soon to be Trans World Dome at America’s Center.

Orthwein was dead set on heading to St. Louis after the 1993 season. At that point, Robert Kraft, who owned the lease on Foxboro Stadium wouldn’t let Orthwein out of the lease, and due to that Orthwein sold the Patriots to Robert Kraft in 1994 and the rest is history.

I’m shaking my head even writing this stuff!

Thinking back on the entire saga of expansion one would have never thought it would have been this messy, yet it was.

At this point, the dream of having a franchise in St. Louis looked all but dead, on life support, but then, out of nowhere, there came a savior of football in St. Louis, or at least we thought.

Part 2 of this series will be coming soon, stay tuned.

Derek King

N The Zone Contributor

Sources: New York Times, St. Louis Post Dispatch, Chicago Tribune

 

Social Media Numbers & Rankings For All 32 NFL Teams: Facebook, Twitter & Instagram

@RealShaneGray

As you likely know, social media is a major thing in today’s world. Outlets like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram (IG) dominate the free time of many Americans.

According to statistia.com, an estimated 185 million Americans used some form of social media in 2016. Statistically, 78 percent of Americans possessed at least one account last year, up five percent from the previous year and eleven percent from 2014. When this year’s data comes in, you can bet that at least four of every five U.S. citizens will have had one or more social media profiles set up.

With such a large percentage of people in the United States utilizing social media, one can gauge how interested society at large is in various people, products and sports teams. In this case, one can track these sites to measure the popularity — or relative unpopularity — of the NFL’s 32 teams.

As the data across the platforms of Facebook, Twitter and IG vividly illustrate, regularly successful franchises like the New England Patriots, Dallas Cowboys, Green Bay Packers and Pittsburgh Steelers attract huge followings.
While it should come as no surprise that perennial winners like the Patriots and Cowboys have amassed huge social media audiences, it is notable that recent and/or long term on-field success — not market size — drives the popularity of NFL clubs, as evidenced by the large followings for organizations in small to mid-sized markets like the Packers, Steelers and Carolina Panthers and the relatively small followings for big market clubs like the Los Angeles Rams and New York Jets.

With all that said, I have shared the most up-to-date like and follower numbers from the three largest social media sites (Facebook, Twitter and Instagram) for all 32 NFL franchises below.
It should be noted that the Rams and Los Angeles Chargers likely carry a significant social media following from St. Louis and San Diego, respectively, both from those who continue supporting the team as well as those who have yet to unlike or unfollow those club’s accounts.

Facebook
1. Cowboys: 8.767 M
2. Patriots: 6.968 M
3. Steelers: 6.516 M
4. Packers: 5.454 M
5. Broncos: 4.464 M
6. 49ers: 4.220 M
7. Bears: 4.118 M
8. Seahawks: 4.083 M
9. Saints: 4.064 M
10. Giants: 3.983 M
11. Raiders: 3.409 M
12. Eagles: 3.026 M
13. Panthers: 2.397 M
14. Ravens: 2.359 M
15. Colts: 2.277 M
16. Dolphins: 2.242 M
17. Texans: 2.197 M
18. Vikings: 2.108 M
19. Falcons: 2.041 M
20. Jets: 2.001 M
21. Redskins: 1.983 M
22. Lions: 1.917 M
23. Chargers: 1.607 M
24. Chiefs: 1.553 M
25. Cardinals: 1.456 M
26. Browns: 1.269 M
27. Bengals: 1.197 M
28. Buccaneers: 938 K
29. Titans: 927 K
30. Bills: 859 K
31. Rams: 759 K
32. Jaguars: 592 K

Twitter
1. Patriots: 3.2 M
2. Cowboys: 2.76 M
3. Broncos: 2.14 M
4. Panthers: 2.01 M
5. Steelers: 1.9 M
6. Seahawks: 1.8 M
7. Packers: 1.71 M
8. Eagles: 1.55 M
9. 49ers: 1.54 M
10. Falcons: 1.47 M
11. Giants: 1.45 M
12. Bears: 1.37 M
13. Texans: 1.36 M
14. Jets: 1.1 M
15. Ravens: 1.09 M
16. Saints: 1.08 M
17. Lions: 1.07 M
18. Raiders: 965 K
19. Redskins: 932 K
20. Chiefs: 828 K
21. Browns: 824 K
22. Vikings: 820 K
23. Colts: 799 K
24. Dolphins: 790 K
25. Bengals: 703 K
26. Cardinals: 695 K
27. Bills: 690 K
28. Chargers: 636 K
29. Buccaneers: 610 K
30. Titans: 540 K
31. Rams: 482 K
32. Jaguars: 434 K

Instagram
1. Patriots: 2.5 M
2. Cowboys: 2.3 M
3. Seahawks: 2 M
4. Steelers: 1.5 M
5. Panthers: 1.4 M
5. Giants: 1.4 M
7. Packers: 1.3 M
7. 49ers: 1.3 M
9. Broncos: 1.1 M
10. Raiders: 1 M
11. Eagles: 953 K
12. Texans: 898 K
13. Ravens: 721 K
14. Saints: 700 K
15. Dolphins: 679 K
16. Falcons: 663 K
17. Bears: 636 K
18. Redskins: 572 K
19. Cardinals: 542 K
20. Chiefs: 530 K
21. Vikings: 510 K
22. Jets: 509 K
23. Lions: 500 K
24. Colts: 486 K
25. Chargers: 463 K
26. Browns: 432 K
27. Rams: 385 K
28. Bills: 359 K
29. Bengals: 330 K
30. Jaguars: 283 K
31. Buccaneers: 281 K
32: Titans: 261 K

Follow me on Twitter @RealShaneGray 

Thursday’s Thoughts on Rams Draft and Blues Playoffs

DraftLogoSt. Louis, MO

(@RealShaneGray)

Earlier this month, the Los Angeles Rams traded a plethora of premium 2016 and 2017 draft picks to the Tennessee Titans in exchange for the number one overall selection in the 2016 NFL Draft. In doing so, the Rams bet the farm on the hope that either Jared Goff or Carson Wentz will become the league’s next elite quarterback and help lift the former St. Louis-based franchise out of a decade-plus stretch of frustration and futility.

In giving up a first, two seconds and a third rounder this year and first and third round selections next year, L.A. essentially sealed the franchise’s fate for the next several seasons.

After relinquishing so much draft capital to move up to get their gunslinger, the Rams bold move will do one of two things:

If it works, they have landed themselves a top-tier quarterback to go along with a potentially dominant defense and ground game, and the move will help elevate the organization to the upper echelon of the NFL in rather short order.

If it fails, the risky trade with the Titans will set the franchise back several more seasons and likely keep the franchise fumbling in the won-loss column for several more years.

In short, this trade will all but make or break the Rams hopes to turn the corner in California. This was an all-boom or all-bust deal. Time will tell the tale on how it plays out for Stan Kroenke and company.

Speaking of the Rams Trade…

Unfortunately , St. Louis fans and media alike learned that the Rams front office  — led by team CEO Kevin Demoff — was good at a few things not remotely related to winning football games: lying, manipulating and serving themselves.

With that understood, I couldn’t help but laugh when hearing that the Rams chose to wait a day to announce the aforementioned trade for the number one pick so as to not take away from the final home game of Lakers all-time great Kobe Bryant.

Of course, the Rams made sure to let everyone know that they postponed the news an extra day rather than just quietly announcing the trade the next day and leaving it at that. That’s the Rams, though.

For anyone unclear of the Rams motives, let me break it down for you:

The Rams did that for the Rams. That’s it.

They desired to appeal to Lakers fans by attempting to show consideration for their fan base in an effort to help the Rams and nobody but the Rams. It’s really that simple.

The Rams PR machine continues to be predictably pathetic.

How ‘Bout Those Blues? 

After securing a three games to one advantage over the Chicago Blackhawks in the first round of the NHL’s Western Conference playoffs, the Blues started looking like the same old Blues in faltering to a 3-3 series tie as fans wondered if it was yet another hear-we-go-again- postseason collapse.

But this year, with all the chips on the line, St. Louis stepped up with a thrilling game 7 win at home to the delight of Blues faithful.

As the club is now just a series win away from their first Stanley Cup appearance since 1970, a Finals appearance couldn’t come at a better time for either the Blues or the STL.

With the Rams and the NFL freshly departed, this would be the ideal time for the Blues to grab the attention of former Rams fans who may be looking for another local pro club to turn their attention to. With many football fans feeling scorned, what better time for the Blues to pack the bandwagon than right now? What better time to grow some future die-hard fans with a Stanley Cup appearance just months after the Rams exit?

And for St. Louis, what better time for the Blue note to win a Stanley Cup than right now, with so many sports fans and St. Louisans in general feeling disappointment following the exodus of the world’s preeminent sports league?

Whether you are one of the many have moved on from the Rams move or one of many others who haven’t, this would be a perfect time for the city’s great sports fans and the region in general to enjoy some good fortunes in relation to the region’s pro-sports landscape.

Now perhaps more than over, St. Louis wants to see the Blues get this done and they may have a better shot than they have in awhile to do just that.

Thanks for reading…

SG

It’s Always Been Business – Kroenke Made It Personal: The Unedited Version

56fc306436852.image

ST. LOUIS, MO

@thelegendkil

Since the Los Angeles Rams moved west for greener pastures they continue to be the gift that keeps on giving, especially to the city they spent the last 20 years residing. Just recently USA Today’s columnist Luke Kerr-Dineen wrote a column in regards a new billboard in Los Angeles taking a shot at the city of St.Louis. The billboard for those who’ve haven’t seen yet uses the “Greater Than-Less Than” symbols associated with mathematics. Was it a cheap shot? Of course it was, but it’s the world were living in today.

But, the part in USA Today’s columnist Luke Kerr-Dineen article that really stood out was the following sentence. “There comes a certain point where bitter St.Louis fans will have to accept that, regardless of how the deal went down, the team now belongs in Los Angeles.” Now he’s right the Rams definitely belong in Los Angeles. The part where I completely disagree with is his misinterpretation on bitterness. What he and many other that do not reside in the region realize is that the bitterness and hate towards the Rams have zero to do with the players.

The bitterness is towards Rams owner Stan Kroenke who made sure he defecated over the entire region to the point that no other NFL team would even consider moving to St.Louis. He did it in such a manner that even Oakland Raiders owner Mark Davis who sports a haircut like famed Three Stooges front man Mo Howard thumbed his nose at the possibility of moving the Oakland Raiders to St.Louis. And to pour salt on a gaping wound Kroenke is trying to get tax credits in city of Maryland Heights, and seriously trying selling Rams Park in Earth City for the low price of a $1. Again nobody faults a person for wanting to make money, but the way he went about it was colder than a mother-in-law kiss. Winning was never a priority, at least not on the field and loyal fans in St.Louis showed up for a team that had only four winning seasons in 20 years in St.Louis. The Rams missed the playoffs 80% of the time while here.

And Kroenke isn’t the only person that is at the root of this feeling of bitterness. Rams COO Kevin Demoff gives several meanings to words like “serpent,” “weasel,” or “fatherless child” as he admitted to be glad the Rams lost four games straight so they could focus on moving instead of getting to the playoffs. Then you toss in the shenanigans by the Rams PR Department that got more than upset at me, because I said in an article last year that Demoff was giving the fans mixed signals. And it turned out to be true the entire time. I still shake my head and think about that day I was at Herbert Hoovers Boys Club and it’s 90 plus degrees and the Community Relations Department is laying sod while Demoff and Kroenke continue their lust for money, with the city of Los Angeles acting as an performance enhancing pharmaceutical product.

I think it’s a little unreasonable to think that fans who did care and that did spend their hard earned money on a product that was basically tanking, not to feel more than just bitter about this. And even for those casual fans or your everyday citizen didn’t like how Kroenke defecated on a market that he does a lot of real estate business in. When the Big Red left for Arizona in 1988 they didn’t keep leaving bird droppings on St.Louis. They moved west and carried on.

It’s business and it’s always been business. Kroenke made it personal no question about that. And that’s something USA Today’s columnist Luke Kerr-Dineen don’t understand. St.Louis is flawed just like many other cities across the country, and some people are just sticking up for their hometown. It’s not bitterness. It’s love for your city and your region.

For more sport content please follow @NTheZoneShow and I can also be found on twitter @thelegendkil.